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My world view, insights, thoughts, observations and this is what I intended to say….Part 4

22/01/2014

Why is it that the murder of one man is considered a criminal act whereas the killing of hundreds of thousands of innocent people committed in wars, is not considered so?

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God is not a concept. The concept god is a concept.

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The motor car is the most dangerous weapon in our society—cars kill more than wars do.

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Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical progressive minority, and rapidly promoted by mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a piece of shit by the clean end.

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You’re a ghost driving a meat coated skeleton made from stardust. What do you have to be afraid of?

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`But I don’t want to go among mad people, ‘ Alice remarked.
‘Oh, you can’t help that,’ said the Cat: ‘we’re all mad here. I’m mad. You’re mad.’
‘How do you know I’m mad?’ said Alice.
‘You must be,’ said the Cat, ‘or you wouldn’t have come here.’

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Pain in life is inevitable but suffering is not. Pain is what the world does to you, suffering is what you do to yourself. Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

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Malevolent rulers have kept us in economic subservience for hundreds of thousands of years, if not millions of years. All religions appear to share similar stories. It is possible that this template has been used since the earliest incarnations came to this planet, perhaps billions of years ago. We must learn to live without being economic slaves to the same system of domination and control. Our true history has been hidden from us. What is the purpose of suppressing such information? How many times have civilizations come and gone from this planet?

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Live below your means. Don’t buy stuff you don’t need. Always sleep on big purchases. Create a budget and savings plan and stick to both of them. Don’t enslave yourself to the bankers.

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Slavery didn’t end in 1833, when William Wilberforce’s decades-long campaign resulted in the Slavery Abolition Act. It didn’t end in 1863, when Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. It didn’t end in 1949, when the United Nations declared trafficking “incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person.” The truth is, slavery never ended. It went underground, where it continues to exploit powerless men, women and children throughout the world.

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It’s simple. The boiled frog analogy explains the whole thing. Are not our human rights’ protections slowly evaporating in the same manner? All that’s required is that the heat increases at the necessarily imperceptible gradient.

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The longer I’m alive the less I want to be part of a mindless shallow consumer-driven, dream-drunken, enslaved sector of society—the dominant culture, the mainstream culture, the culture of the walking dead, the culture of the majority with an absence of challenges and a lack of shared values and norms. I rebel against the negative vibrations of that world—devoid of genuine rituals (not rote, empty, meaningless ones).

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We can no more control our thoughts than we can control the weather, as both are phenomena of most amazingly complex natural systems. And if we have no hope of controlling our emotions, we can hardly be held responsible any more than we can be held responsible for feeling hot or cold. We do, however, have complete dominion over our behaviour, and that is a sacred responsibility.

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The freedoms—the feeling of freedom which comes with shedding my responsibilities and worldly things, putting on a rucksack, and heading out. I feel that through shedding all of the restraints and expectations of society I’ve found the key to happiness. Nomads are known to have no permanent home, and travel with the seasons.

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The emphasis on Gallipoli and the Anzac legend has been part of our political culture. It is not part of history. Commemorations tells us about the present rather than the past. A commemoration is inherently political. The Anzac legend serves particular purposes: to reinforce those values that court the Anzac legend such as endurance, sacrifice, mateship. Values continue to be important to Australian governments who, in a materialistic, secular and individualistic society, try to persuade citizens to volunteer for war or serve as police officers or fire fighters. People willing to subordinate their individual needs and take risks for the interest of the collective. The commemoration calendar deflects debate about the legitimacy of war. This was obvious during the Iraq invasion of 2003, when John Howard made it difficult to criticise the war because you would thereby be criticising those who chose to serve. With that goes a silencing of debate about the reasons that soldiers are deployed. Our tradition is about honouring volunteer soldiers.

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