Skip to content

My world view, insights, thoughts, observations and this is what I intended to say….Part 2

13/01/2014

The mainstream media won’t touch it, unless it’s in shameless defence of the never ending War on Terrorism that is used to “justify” attacks on countries around the globe. 9/11 and the media disinformation have set into motion over a decade of war, and there are still many unanswered questions surrounding that fateful day.
*
A history of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela could ask, How was the Galician cult of St James transformed into an international one attracting thousands of pilgrims from distant parts of the world?  Is the answer to be found in the approach by the holy, political, and commercial as in earlier times? The Galician authorities recognise the value of pilgrims to the economy of that autonomous community. Could the answer be found in modern day pilgrim behaviour?

What is the basis for the passion that drives pilgrims to Santiago? Many pilgrims return time and time again despite the hardships, deprivations, illnesses, costs that many can ill afford, and often increase the distances of their journeys. On their arrival at the cathedral, pilgrims openly embrace the statue of St James with tear-filled-eyes, and lavish him with hugs, kisses, caresses. Under the main altar of the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, inside a silver urn, is the Tomb of St James. It is allegedly where his mortal remains, together with those of his disciples St Athanasius and St Theodore, rest in peace. How does one explain that people sit and pray to a  silver urn that is of doubtful origin. This is the mystery of Santiago!
*
In order to gain courage, you must find a way to face your fears. Batman and Joker faced some of the darkest fears we have as human beings: death, the unknown, oblivion, infinity, darkness, and fear itself. Facing these unknowable scenarios in life is essential to finding courage within yourself.
*
Decide who you actually are, whether it’s a poet, parent, or whatever; explore your own spirituality. Nothing else is more important than discovering who you truly are and what you really want out of life. Discovering your inner happiness and motivation is the first step toward walking alone—you can’t walk alone unless you know where you’re going.
*
I don’t know how much experience you have stepping out of line, but for the uninitiated, let me assure you that you’ll be noticed. People want everything in order, but in order to progress, we have to keep evolving and pushing forward. If you want to walk alone, you’ll have to be OK with being noticed, and it won’t always be good notice either. Don’t ask what people think about you or your plans. Consider all information in front of yourself and remain focused on the prize.
*
The first rule of life is to act like you belong there. The way to do that is to smile with confidence. As long as you’re confident and smiling, you can get through anything. Try being the first person on the dance floor; they’re the ones getting the party started. Until that one person dances, a dance floor is simply a floor, no matter how good the music is. Forget about how dumb you may look or what people may think of you, and smile like you’re living your life for yourself. There’s only one way to become a legend: stand up for yourself, and walk alone.
*
Remembering that you’re going to die is the best way to avoid the trap of thinking I have something to lose. You’re already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.
*
The Pentagon is in something of a panic over it’s longest war. How can a bunch of lightly-armed mountain tribesmen in turbans fighting only part-time battle the world’s most powerful armed forces to a standstill?
*
Life gets much of its meaning from the fact that it ends. Humans have no special destiny or future. Old age confirms such pessimism.
*
Ageism is discrimination against persons of old age—people like me. There is a stupid if not an idiotic tendency to regard older persons as debilitated, unworthy of attention, or unsuitable for employment. Among them were prejudicial attitudes towards older people, old age, and the aging process; discriminatory practices against older people; and institutional practices and policies that perpetuate stereotypes about older people. I recently began recording instances of ageism against me, and the list is growing, and I’m pissed-of living in this discriminatory culture. I want to remind these discriminatory sods that their turn will come. Remember, as ye sow, so shall ye reap.

Unfortunately, many old people fit this stereotype in every which way. They follow the search of comfort that intensifies on reaching retirement age. Comfort requires no search if it is part of the dominant culture and endlessly repeated on the mainstream media further amplified by the mindless repeating of clichés. The quest for comfort is problematic and avoids learning, experiencing, personal growth/development. Comfort is familiar. No challenges. No learning. No new experiences. Doldrums. No growth. Fear stops many from pursuing their dreams, and cause them to give up and give in, keeping them prisoner in their comfort zone. Whereas, life is not about being comfortable. It’s about pressing forward out of our comfort zones. It’s about getting up everyday and accepting whatever challenge we are faced with, and staying faithful to our truths. That’s how we make the most of our life.

Rather the search for discomfort than the dominant all pervasive consumption model created by advertising, obsolescence and credit. This enslaves, cripples, in debts people who are powerless to respond.
*
Let go of judgments, expectations, wanting to be right, wanting to control, fear of discomfort, fear of uncertainty, fear of failure, fear of boredom, comparing yourself to others, wanting distraction, being irritated, complaining. It’s noticing when you’re holding these, and letting go. Loosen your heart’s grip on any of these, and let them go.
*
Remember that life is and will always be a mystery.
*
In Australia asylum seekers are sacrificed on the altar of the God of racism and xenophobia to ensure the constituents’ electoral support. Retain or regain power!
*
The more conscious I become, the more I reject the society constructed around me. I’m trying to find peace, but its hard…
*
Ever heard of Ayahuasca? There is a growing interest in hallucinogens—particularly Ayahuasca—that is giving it a new image of spiritual learning. In the mid 1950s Aldous Huxley, after taking mescalin, popularised the word hallucinogen. Huxley was a volunteer in experiments set up by psychiatrist Humphry Osmond, who coined the term ‘psychedelic.’ My interest in Ayahuasca goes back to 1992. I was in San Diego, California where I met two Shamans (Canadian and Brazilian) who told me about the “sacred spirit medicine ceremony.” I was invited by the Brazilian to attend a sacred ceremony in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. I didn’t. I never did.
*
Belief in the traditional sense, or certitude, or dogma, amounts to the grandiose delusion: “My model of the universe will never need to be revised.” Whereas, the history of science and knowledge in general tells us that this position is not only absurd but also arrogant, if not stupid. Yet many people continue live with such a medieval attitude.
*
There’s a cheaper and safer drug than the one I prescribed for you. It’s no secret that pharmaceutical companies push new drugs on doctors. But now they employ data-mining to do so. For a licensing fee, industry marketers can access the American Medical Association’s database of physicians, which allows sales reps to track down precisely which drugs a doctor is prescribing. That’s how reps get incentivised—they know what drugs to pitch to what physicians. Those drugs are always the most expensive drugs. And we don’t have a full understanding of the safety profile of these drugs. Vioxx is exhibit A. In 2004, Merck pulled its blockbuster anti-arthritis drug after a study revealed that Vioxx increased patients’ risk of heart attack and stroke; the company has paid out billions of dollars to settle the resulting lawsuits. Cheap alternative: ibuprofen.
*
Untold numbers of people across the world are waking up to official lies, cover stories, and conspiracies. These people are crossing the bridge, so to speak, to see what’s on the other side, and according to the newest addition of the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) these nonconforming and freethinking people have a mental illness. The manual identifies a new mental illness called “oppositional defiant disorder” or ODD. Defined as an “ongoing pattern of disobedient, hostile and defiant behaviour,” symptoms include questioning authority, negativity, defiance, argumentativeness, and being easily annoyed. Is nonconformity and freethinking a mental illness? Of course not!
*
I prefer the way of Zen and Taoist masters: quiet your mind, connect with the universal mind and receive the information you seek through your intuition, instead of trying to work it out analytically. Then you’ll know, and you won’t feel the need for endless words and labels, or to justify and argue about endless technicalities.
*
Cancer is big business. Despite massive public screening campaigns and talk of cures, cancer rates continue to soar, and pharmaceutical companies not only profit from making the chemicals that cause cancer but also from selling the drugs that treat it.
*
There is no single cause and effect.
*
I look up from what I’m doing and realised that I’m content. Nothing needs to be added or taken away. I know that contentment is more of an internal state of being rather than derived through external circumstances. Yet, I am human and therefore influenced by my surroundings.
*
Once upon a time, I was a guest at a Rinzai Zen temple in Okayama, Japan. My time there was challenging to state the obvious, but rewarding. It was there that I learned the art of cooking rice. The recipes all state to add 1.5 cups of water for every cup of rice. That may or may not be correct. I never tried it. I was instructed to use my forefinger as a dipstick and fill the pan to a level of the first knuckle above the rice. Perfect rice is guaranteed.
*
Buddha called death one of the main forms of suffering. He was referring not just to the physical act of dying, but also to the leaving of this life, with all its pleasures and joys, its relationships and attachments. We don’t know what happens to us after death, but just the thought that we will no longer exist as we have in this world is terrifying.
*
An awareness of death reminds us of the precious nature of life, and thus provides us with a saner perspective on the problem of the life we are living. Nevertheless, such an awareness does not lessen our fear of the fact that we will die.
*
In depression we are keenly aware of death. Indeed, the thought of death seems to always be present in our minds. We may think about our own death often. At times we may even with for it. We also think about the deaths of all the people and possessions and relationships we hold dear. We become acutely aware of the impermanence of all things around us.
*
And our perception is correct. This world is impermanent. Everything is living and dying around us constantly.
*
There is a story of a woman during Buddha’s time whose child had died. She came with the child to Buddha, asking if he could bring the child back to life. Buddha responded that he could do so if she could bring him a mustard seed from a family that had not known the death of a parent, child, or friend. She went eagerly looking for the mustard seed. When she returned, empty-handed she had learned that there is no one who is not affected by death.
*
We are all surprised when we read a story about two people who fall in love and marry even though one is terminally ill. It seems to require great love and courage to risk such a frightening and painful journey, to decide to love someone whom you know will be taken from you soon.
*
We go forward, even though we are here only for a short time. We live day after day, and love other fragile human beings with a tenuous hold on life. Doesn’t this require great courage and great love?
*
The reality of death is a painful truth. It is what gives life its bittersweet taste, its mystery. But this is how things are. Though life will end in death for everyone, we can jump into this world and live in it fully. We can keep in our minds and hearts the awareness that death and impermanence are what give life its preciousness, its beauty.
*
Darwin’s notion of selective change occurring because of the coincidence of the right circumstances for the right individuals is not the likely explanation for evolution. It seems far more likely that our “junk” DNA is not “junk” at all, and it is this DNA (it actually comprises about 90% of our DNA) that results in “evolutionary” change. It seems that just as we are able to make conscious adaptations to our environment that there is another level of consciousness in our bodies, that we are unaware of, that is also continually working to optimise our body’s response to the environment and also that of the next generation of human beings.
*
5 November commemorates Guy Fawkes’ failed 1605 Gunpowder Plot to blow up the House of Lords in London. A mask bearing his stylised visage—which featured prominently in V for Vendetta – has been adopted by Anonymous and Occupy Wall Street protesters as a universal symbol against tyranny.
*
Heathcote Williams’ Autogeddon (1991) is a campaigning narrative poem with an anthology of prose writings on the devastating effect of the motor car on our lives. More than 17 million people have been killed on the roads in the century since the first motor car appeared and an incalculable number seriously hurt, or have died later from the effects of road accidents. This is but one fact among many that build up to the evidence of man’s heedless inhumanity to his fellow traveller. It is a revelation of the extent to which the human psyche has become possessed by a machine until it can no longer control the effects of it.
*
Free yourself from toxic people. Spend time with people who are smart, driven and like-minded. Relationships should help you, not hurt you. Surround yourself with people who reflect the person you want to be. Choose friends who you are proud to know, people you admire, who love and respect you – people who make your day a little brighter simply by being in it. Life is too short to spend time with people who suck the happiness out of you. When you free yourself from negative people, you free yourself to be YOU – and being YOU is the only way to truly live.
*
Every human rights violation is the responsibility of the state. The state is accountable for every crime, even if the abuse happens between civilians. Some may be tempted to contest this rule of responsibility. But in the world of human rights, the state has a duty to protect its citizens against any human rights abuses.

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: